St louis heat pump repair

It’s something no one is used to seeing outside the winter months — as the sun beats down, you go outside to examine your air conditioning unit and see it covered in a thick layer of ice.

It might not seem possible that an air conditioner located outside could become frozen during the warmer months of the year, but it is. In most cases, this ice is a sign of something not functioning properly in your home’s air conditioning system.

So if you’re asking yourself “Why is my air conditioner frozen,” you might want to take a look at these three common factors that cause an air conditioning system to freeze — and whether or not you should call in a home air conditioning repair to fix them:

Suppressed airflow

If airflow to your air conditioning unit is insufficient, it will cause the system’s evaporator coil to drop below freezing temperature. As humidity collects on this coil, the moisture will freeze, causing ice to gradually build up. This problem can be fixed by replacing your dirty air filters and making sure your air ducts are functioning and free of obstructions.

System refrigeration problems

Leaking refrigerant or low levels of this substance can also cause your air conditioner’s evaporator coil to freeze. In this case, you’ll want to call in an air conditioning repair specialist to fix the leaking refrigerant and get your system back to normal.

Outdoor temperature

If the temperature outside is below 60 degrees Fahrenheit, it’s unlikely that your air conditioner will be able to function at its full potential. If the outside temperature dips below this mark, freeze-ups in your outdoor air conditioner will likely take place.

Have any other questions for us about seeking out heating and cooling services? Let us know by leaving a comment below. See more. See this link for more references.