Working with a home builder

Many people seem to have fond memories of the neighborhoods of their youth. They speak of neighbors watching each others children and running next door to borrow a cup of sugar. Many of those memories, however, have skipped over other parts of the neighborhoods of the past. With no control over the type of home that was built, home values often fluctuated as individual buyers purchased properties and attempted to deal with neighborhoods that had no homeowners covenants or regulations.
When one neighbor, for example, decided to black top a driveway on a block that otherwise has cement drives there appeared to be no way to suggest consistency. When another neighbor decided to build an insanely tall shed that blocks the view of the mountains you have no course of action. While all is well when neighbors are helping each other with childcare or borrowing each other’s essential recipe ingredients, neighbors can find stressful situations like property values, out buildings, and home and lawn upkeep too much to handle.
Understanding the Benefits of Master Planned Communities Makes for Happy Home Owners
Master planned community developers often pride themselves in finding a unique mix of modern home plans that provide opportunities for single family homes in a variety of price ranges. Retirement areas like Florida are especially known for marketing the benefits of master planned communities that allow for plenty of green space, as well as miles of walking and biking paths. A place like Conner Preserve, in central Pasco County, Florida, for example, is a natural area known for its water management and preservation since 2003. The Connor Preserve landscape includes steep sandhill ridges, marshes, cypress sloughs, as well as pine flatwoods.
Whether you are looking to experience the benefits of master planned communities in Florida, in the midwest, or on either coast, you are likely looking for some of the same details that attract all new home buyers. According to the newest research, storage, space, and a choice of quality appliances are top priorities for new home buyers. Additionally, 89% of home owners in 2013 made sure that the new homes they bought came with a separate laundry room. Equally important where needed, a survey by the National Association of Realtors indicated that 65% of buyers said a home with central air conditioning was essential.
Planned Communities Help Neighbors Get Along
Social benefits of master planned communities include neighborhood involvement, home improvement guidelines and assistance, predictable finance charges, family health and wellness sites, and stable real estate values. Living in a planned community erases many of the problems that neighbors mind otherwise find stressful.
For example, neighbors in a planned community have covenants and guidelines that regulate some of the things that can cause disagreements. When you know, for instance, that no one in the neighborhood is going to be allowed to build backyard storage structures, this is a discussion point that will never become stressful. If a planned community controls who the builders are in their development, the homes in the neighborhood will remain consistent. No one person will be allowed to construct a log cabin home, for example, in the middle of a neighborhood full of stucco structures.
Without demanding that every house look exactly the same, the planned community developers can control things like mailbox size, structure and placement. They can also ensure that the development maintains large amounts of green spaces and walking a biking trails.
Other things you might consider when looking at building a new house or purchasing an existing home in a planned community include:

  • What amenities are available? For example, does the neighborhood have an outdoor pool. do they regulate the usage so the space is never overwhelmed with people who should not be there.
  • Will you be working with a trusted developer? Planned communities, like any home, are an investment. Be sure to check the financial background of the group you will be joining.
  • Talk to your neighbors before you move in. Instead of waiting to get to know your new neighbors after you buy, planned community members should try to talk to these residents first. Are they happy with their decision to live in this community? Do they have common complaints?